Gender Pay Gap 2017

Bay Education Trust

Gender Pay Gap Report – relevant date 31st March 2017

Total staff = 436.    Female = 334 (76.6%), Male =102 (23.4%)

Mean Gender Pay Gap 23.2%

Median Gender Pay Gap 44.4%

Percentage of Male staff receiving bonus payments = 0%

Percentage of Female staff receiving bonus payments = 0%

Proportion of males and females in each quartile pay band:

  • 109 employees in the lower quartile. 89 (81.7%) are female and 20 (18.3%) are male.
  • 109 employees in the lower middle quartile. 96 (88.1%) are female and 13 (11.9%) are male.
  • 109 employees in the upper middle quartile. 78 (71.6%) are female and 31(28.4%) are male.
  • 109 employees in the upper quartile. 71 (65.1%) are female and 38 (34.9%) are male.

Narrative

The gender pay gap information for the Bay Education Trust as at 31st March 2017 is based upon 436 employees.  Of the 436 employees 334 (76.6%) are female and 102 (23.4%) are male.

The employee total (436) is made up of 139 teaching staff and 297 support staff.

Of the 297 support staff 243 (81.8%) are female and 54 (18.2%) are male.  The high percentage of females in support staff roles has a significant impact on both the mean gender pay gap figure and the median gender pay gap figure for the Bay Education Trust.  This is because support staff roles e.g. Teaching Assistants, Administrators, Caretakers / Cleaners are paid hourly rates below the hourly rates of teaching staff.

Of the 139 teachers 91(65.5%) are female and 48 (34.5%) are male.

The gender split of staff within the Bay Education Trust reflects the gender split in schools nationally.  The Schools Workforce Census in England (published July 2017) shows that 80% of all school staff are female.  74% of FTE teachers are female and 82% of school support staff are female.  91% of teaching assistants are female.

It should be noted that the mean hourly rate for female teaching staff within the Bay Education Trust is higher than the mean hourly rate for male teaching staff.

The median hourly rate is the same for female and male teaching staff.

The mean hourly rate for female support staff is 7.5% lower than the mean hourly rate for male support staff.

The median hourly rate for female support staff is 3.2% lower than the median hourly rate for male support staff is £8.82

The overall mean gender pay gap figure (23.2%) and median gender pay gap figure (44.4%) are directly influenced by the high numbers of female staff in support roles compared to male staff.

The issue for the Bay Education Trust is not one of equal pay as the Trust continues to pay all teachers on nationally agreed pay rates and pays support staff in line with pay grades determined by the local authority’s Job Evaluation Scheme.

The issue for the Bay Education Trust is the high percentage of female staff employed in support staff roles which are generally lower paid than teaching roles.

The national School Workforce data indicates that the concentration of females in support staff roles will influence the Gender Pay Gap figures for schools / academies across the country and this is borne out by the Office for National Statistics – Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (Oct 2017) which shows that women working in the educational sector earn on average 26.3% less than men in England, Scotland and Wales.

The Bay Education Trust currently employs a female Executive Headteacher across  its two primary schools.  There is female Head of School in each primary school, along with two female Assistant Headteachers.  In the Trust’s Secondary setting three of six Assistant Headteachers are female.  In addition, the Trust’s Chief Finance Officer and Operations Officer are female.

The Bay Education Trust will continue to encourage and support the appointment of female staff into positions at all levels across the organisation. However, to address the current overall mean and median gender pay gaps the Trust will need to seek to better balance the number of males and females in support staff roles across the organisation.  The Trust will need to be mindful of the current national split of male / female support staff in schools as it seeks to reduce the gender pay gap.  The reality is that while the percentage of females in support staff roles in schools remains so high it is unlikely that the overall gender pay gap figures in the education sector can be closed significantly as they are calculated using mean and median averages.